19 Jan 2018

Crap questions to ask at interview

It's that time of year when everyone says 'New Year, New Career'.  And it's true, traditionally, this is a busy time of year for recruiters where lots of candidates brush up their CVs and prepare to find something new.  It's also true that you see a lot of articles in the media with 'advice' on how to get your dream job or what to say at interview.  I realise that these articles are written by journalists for a broad audience, however I was reading this week's Stylist magazine (freebie found in city centres) and found myself snorting at their suggestions of questions to ask at your next interview.  I'm afraid I'm at odds with their suggestions.  I think most of our agency clients in the North would scoff if asked any of these....

1.  What are you doing to ensure your male and female employees have equal pay? 

Heck, do you want to look antagonistic?  If you're male, they'll wonder why you're asking and if you're female I think you'll automatically put yourself in the 'potentially difficult to manage' category.  Now that might not be politically correct and don't get me wrong, I definitely believe that men and women should be paid equivalent salaries for doing equivalent jobs.  But really....there are many more questions that you can ask directly about the business which don't get people's backs up or which might get their backs up.  Don't go there (at interview) would be my advice.

2.  How flexi is your flexitime?

Seriously.  This is up there with 'what is your sick leave policy'.    There is a time and place to start the conversation about flexi-time. With your recruitment consultant or at second stage.  Not to be asked at first stage - unless the employer brings it up.  Even then, answer cautiously.

3.  How does your company support its employee's wellbeing?

Technically there is nothing wrong with the question.  However, the main focus of the interview IMO is to sell yourself to the potential employer.  I agree it's also the employer's responsibility to sell themselves and their business to you too.  Hopefully they can cover it off without you mentioning it.  I do think there are better ways of asking the question.

4.  How could Brexit affect this role?

I suppose this is fair enough.  BUT again think about context.  For most agencies, I don't think it's too relevant whereas if you're interviewing at a global manufacturing giant then perhaps.  My friend who's a pilot was asked it recently and he talked about oil prices etc so again just consider how you think it could affect the role. If you've no idea, I wouldn't ask the question.  Personally.

5.  How do you encourage staff to give back?

As I progress through these questions.....they are probably more relevant if you're interviewing at a huge blue chip and perhaps by an HR person.  I appreciate that we all want to work in businesses who are socially responsible but most agencies are not going to consider this being a very relevant question.  Review their website in advance and see if they talk about this - if they do, you can broach it if it's important to you.

6.  What new skills can I learn?

Phrase it differently.  You can talk about how adapting and learning new skills are important to you but essentially, it's more likely that the potential employer wants to hear about what skills you're going to bring to them....Make sure you listen to what they are looking for and adapt your answers accordingly - and then work this question into the conversation.

7.  They had a final question....Big picture of a dog and then 'will I have time to walk him?'  Ho Ho. 

Don't even think about it.

I'm not trying to come across as a hard core facist recruiter where the employer holds all the cards and to a certain extent you have to say what they want to hear (sell yourself) if you want to get the job.  Save more 'soft' questions for later interview stages. The first interview should be about chemistry, fit, do you currently have the skills to do the role, what is the progression and career trajectory for you.

If you asked all these questions at first stage, I don't think you'd get the job. You'd potentially look like a challenging individual who isn't committed to working that hard.  Yes it depends on the business, how you ask the questions and the job you're applying for but don't just ask questions that some magazine suggests are good to ask at interview.  Think about it in context of the business and environment that you are looking at and then come up with some more relevant questions that are pertinent to the role.  Save anything tricky for advanced stage (when you know they want you) and go from there.

Finally, I do actually have some agency clients where people take their dogs to work.  Just saying!